A Critical Analysis of James Stuart’s A History of the Zulu Rebellion, 1906

A 2014 article by Paul Thompson which critically examines James Stuart’s 1913 A History of the Zulu Rebellion. Thompson analysed how the book was produced, what sources were used, and how, despite the withdrawal of government funds, Stuart had succeeded in completing and publishing the work. Stuart had served as an intelligence officer during the rebellion. In its aftermath, he accepted an offer to historicise what had taken place. To collect data, make maps, and take photos, he visited the colonial base at Greytown and the battlefields. Knowledgeable militia were consulted for further information. Stuart also consulted six members of the native police and several rebels. Between 1906 and 1912, however, he was beset by his duties as Native Affairs magistrate. It was only after stepping down from his role that he managed to complete work on his book.

The article can be viewed online here.

To cite:

Thompson, Paul. “A Critical Analysis of James Stuart’s A History of the Zulu Rebellion 1906”. History in Africa 41 (2014), 195-220.

Online from: 17 Dec 2020